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01952 460119Park Street, Shifnal, Shropshire, Near Telford, TF11 9BG

Healthy Gums

Screening for gum disease forms an integral part of your routine examination.

What is gum disease?

Gum disease describes swelling, soreness or infection of the tissues supporting the teeth. There are two main forms of gum disease: gingivitis and periodontal disease.

What is gingivitis?

Gingivitis means inflammation of the gums. This is when the gums around the teeth become very red and swollen. Often the swollen gums bleed when they are brushed during cleaning.

What is periodontal disease?

Long-standing gingivitis can turn into periodontal disease. There are a number of types of periodontal disease and they all affect the tissues supporting the teeth. As the disease gets worse the bone anchoring the teeth in the jaw is lost, making the teeth loose. If this is not treated, the teeth may eventually fall out.

What is the cause of gum disease?

All gum diseases are caused by plaque. Plaque is a film of bacteria which forms on the surface of the teeth and gums every day. Many of the bacteria in plaque are completely harmless, but there are some that have been shown to be the main cause of gum disease. To prevent and treat gum disease, you need to make sure you remove all the plaque from your teeth every day. This is done by brushing and flossing.

What happens if gum disease is not treated?

Unfortunately, gum disease progresses painlessly on the whole so that you do not notice the damage it is doing. However, the bacteria are sometimes more active and this makes your gums sore. This can lead to gum abscesses, and pus may ooze from around the teeth. Over a number of years, the bone supporting the teeth can be lost. If the disease is left untreated for a long time, treatment can become more difficult.

How do I know if I have gum disease?

The first sign is blood on the toothbrush or in the rinsing water when you clean your teeth. Your gums may also bleed when you are eating, leaving a bad taste in your mouth. Your breath may also become unpleasant.

June 05 2020 Update – Reopening Soon!

We are excited to be preparing for our return to the practice as soon as possible after the 8th June.  We know it is important to keep our patients as informed as possible and we wanted to let you know there will be some slight changes in your visits during the next few months.

Shifnal Dental Care has always adhered to the rigorous cross infection procedures set out by the governing bodies and all of our team members are highly trained in all aspects of cross infection control.  However, there are some additional Covid-19 procedures to follow and one of these is the social distancing rules that we have all become used to over the last couple of months.

You will receive information  before your appointment, this may be via email or via the post or a telephone conversation this will include some details you will need to complete before attending.  This will help us to continue to keep our patients and teams safe.

Things to know about your next appointment:

  • Before leaving home please remember to brush your teeth, use the toilet and wash your hands for 20 seconds before leaving.
  • Please bring the minimal number of belongings with you.
  • Please phone us once you have arrived in the carpark.
  • Please wait in your car or by the door and we will call you in as soon as possible.
  • Please attend unaccompanied unless you require a carer or parent.
  • On entry into the practice – we will have a welcome point and a member of our team will take your temperature, ask you to sanitise your hands.
  • In the surgery , we will be wearing full PPE- please do not be worried it is still us!
  • Before you leave the surgery we will ask you to sanitise your hands.
  • When you leave the surgery we will begin the disinfection and sterilisation process of the surgery.
  • Payments and future bookings will be organised at reception keeping within the social distancing rules.
  • On leaving the premises we will ask you to sanitise your hands and we will look forward to seeing you again!

We hope you understand that this is for everyone’s safety and we would appreciate your patience and cooperation as we negotiate these difficult times.